Lake Atitlan, Panajachel, Guatemala

“Reading and writing are acts of empathy and faith. Guard that trust carefully — in this rapidly changing business, it’s the only sure thing.” ~Erin Keane
"Never give up. And most importantly, be true to yourself. Write from your heart, in your own voice, and about what you believe in." ~ Louise Brown

"Write something to suit yourself and many people will like it; write something to suit everybody and scarcely anyone will care for it."
~Jesse Stuart

"A writer's job is to take one thing and make it stand for twenty." ~ Virginia Woolf

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

When a 10 year old writes a story with passion but no punctuation and you know if it was a school assignment he'd have gotten a bad grade but it's so good you want to give him a prize or at least publish it on your blog

We went to Bufallo Wild Wings and dad decided he wanted to do the wing challenge so asked if they still did it and they said yes so then they told the manager and he got this big red light like a siren but without the noise and he put it on the table then he got a microphone and all the speakers in the cafe were saying to find the red light and watch that table because my dad was doing the wing challenge. So my dad had to finish 12 wings (with bones) that had the spiciest sauce on them in under 6 minutes. So the guy hit a buzzer and dads time started the guy was watching our table the entire time but dad finished with a 5:53.


19 comments:

  1. That's quite an accomplishment. Congrats dad! What a sweet little story.

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  2. Cute! And with seven seconds to spare. I like spicy, but no way I could do that.

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  3. I bet the story ended a few hours later when "dad" was in the bathroom crying out in pain.

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  4. He said ice cream helped a lot after, although how he had room for ice cream I don't know. He did get a free t shirt....but had to pay for the wings.

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  5. No punctuation gives it a breathless quality. Just the right thing for this winged story.

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  6. Love this as it reminds us to just write what we feel what we see what we hear as we are feeling seeing and hearing it and then later when the inspiration has waned a bit go back and edit cause if we always edit as we go we edit out all the fire

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    1. Donna, Excellent point! I'm going to remember it next time I write a first draft.

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  7. It reads like it probably happened and I love that you published this on your blog.

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  8. My head would explode if I did that. Love the story and the run on sentence but you do feel the passion from the boy. It makes for an exciting story!

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  9. LOL. That is a great and funny story. My son has done that challenge.
    Susan Says

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  10. Sounds like a great challenge. Greetings!

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  11. Go, Dad, Go! Also, that is definitely one of the frustrations of schoolwork. What I would say, were I in your shoes, is I'd go "Awesome! I love this work!" Proceed to praise it and talk about it and THEN, after we've done a good job congratulating, revisit and say, "Hey, let's make a few revisions." That way they can both learn AND keep inspired.

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  12. I was so absorbed in the story I didn't even notice the lack of punctuation. Now that's storytelling!

    That reminds me of Frank McCourt's novel, Angela's Ashes. In the beginning it used to drive me crazy by his lack of punctuation, but as I read on, not only did I get used to it, it wouldn't have been the same had he punctuated 'perfectly'.

    I learned a lot about writing from that book. McCourt was a very clever storyteller.

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    1. Maria, Angela's Ashes is one of my all time favorite books. Funny, I never noticed anything about the punctuation in reading it, remembering how engrossed in the story I was. Now I want to read it again!

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  13. No insecure writer there, that's for sure. I love books that don't take punctuation too seriously. As for me, I always put in too many commas, or so I think. I also love books that get rid of these " " to note that someone is saying something I mean one gets that they are, as a rule. And in Swedish we don't use them. Quotation marks, there, I remembered. Oh, Karen, I didn't mean to get so into this. Have a great day!

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    1. Inger, That's interesting you don't use quotation marks in Swedish literature. I imagine you can find them quite distracting then when you read a book in English.

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  14. That's awesome. What did he get for that? Was his meal free?

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    1. Stephanie, He had to pay for the meal but he did get a free t-shirt :)

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  15. Wow that's an impressive time. And I love the way the kid just wrote the story as he'd tell it. Breathless, all-in-one and very fast. Sometimes, leaving out the punctuation is exactly what the story needs. ;-)

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